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[ Salvia ]

Salvia is Mexican plant. The leaves produce hallucinogenic effects when chewed or smoked when dry.

Salvia creates a hallucinogenic effect- how strong will depend on the dose you take. Hallucinations can be short but intense. You could see vivid imagery and have a very altered perception of time.

A typical dose of Salvia would be around 0.5g for the leaf or 0.10g if smoking extracted Salvia which is stronger.

What you need to know

While Salvia has been around for 100s of years there has not been much research into the long term effects but we do know that can you build up a tolerance to the effects. If you use salvia frequently you may build up a tolerance meaning higher amounts are needed to feel the effects which could put you at more risk.

Legal Information

Salvia is covered by The Psychoactive Substances Act. It was introduced in the UK on the 26th May 2016 and it makes it an offence to manufacture, export/import (i.e. buying from a non-UK website), supply or offer to supply any psychoactive substance, if likely to be used for its psychoactive effects. Despite being psychoactive, alcohol, nicotine, tobacco and caffeine are exempt from the act.

Under the new regulations, possession with intent to supply is an offence. Possession is not an offence, except in a ‘custodial institution’ (e.g. prison, young offenders centre).

Penalties range from civil sanctions to a 7 year prison sentence but some offences will be considered to be aggravated, including selling to under 18s or around schools and children’s homes etc.

The Human Medicines Regulations (2012) and the Misuse of Drugs Act (1971) including Temporary Class Drug Orders (TCDOs) will remain unchanged.

The police have increased powers to stop and search individuals and premises, and NPS may be treated like a controlled drug until proven otherwise.